How to Play in Beaten Path Oil Pattern- A Short Guideline for You

beaten path oil patternKegel Navigation Patterns are challenging but not cruel like the USBC approved sports pattern and also not easy like the THS pattern. That’s why Kegel came up with these medium-type patterns because the bowling industry was lacking them. So what Kegel did is- they took some of the successful patterns and tweaked them just enough so that they are perfect for the medium difficulty range. One of such patterns is the Beaten Path Oil Pattern. Now, you must be wondering, how easy or difficult is this pattern for newbies or professionals. Well, to know that, first, you have to learn why and how this Beaten Path pattern is different. Only after that, you will have an idea of how to crush it on this lane. So let’s find out!

What is beaten path oil pattern?

Based on the difficulty level, Kegel Navigation Patterns are grouped and divided into three categories; 1. Sport, 2. Challenge, and 3. Recreation. Beaten Path is one of the Challenge Series Oil Patterns.

Slightly longer than the Middle Road, the 41 feet Beaten Path oil pattern is extraordinary. Due to the added length, this lane isn’t actually short. You will see better options of attack but it will be a bit more limited on the Beaten Path oil pattern. Usually, you will see the best result if you play when the lane is quite worn out and you roll the ball over the highest friction or most worn part of the lane surface. The bowlers who are experts and can excel in reading the lanes will find Beaten Path relatively easy. If you want to change your direction too far off the Beaten Path, the pattern will seem much more difficult than it really is.

How long is the typical beaten path oil pattern?

A typical beaten path oil pattern is 41 feet long. On this lane you will find, Forward oil is 12.05 mL, Reverse oil is 12.20 mL and in Total 24.25 mL volume of oil. If you didn’t know already, Kegel Challenge Series oil patterns have ratios between 3:1 to 5:1. Generally, if the ratios are low down lane, you have to understand that the pattern will be difficult to play.

How do you play the beaten path oil pattern?

Generally, Beaten Path should play 10 down lane, so it’s four and a half to one at 41 feet. Most players depending on their rev rate and what balls they are using, should aim for 10 or close to 9 and 10 for the breakpoint overall to get that ball reaction you desire.

If you love to bowl at a high ball speed, you should have a more forward roll and make your bowling ball stay a bit closer to the breakpoint down lane. Balls with more surface will give you more traction in the front with a less axis tilt, and that’s why you have to play a bit tighter. But, if you have s slower ball speed with a lot more axis rotation, you will have the benefits of getting around the corner. You will be able to swing the pattern a lot easier using balls that hit the pins dry and come back pretty hard.

Are you a lefty? Don’t worry, we got you covered as well. If speed isn’t your jam, we believe you will be quite softer during your ball swing, especially at the bottom. Your ball would go quite left and you will see the breakpoint right on time. If you lean down harder than you usually do, you can get away with more area. With a higher rev and less speed, you will be able to cheat your ball reaction. In case, if it looks like you’re about to miss, your axis rotation and rev rate will save you from that and ensure a perfect shot.

So what about speed dominant players? Well, you will have to tug the oil line a bit more. Just make sure you stay close to the 10. If you’re into spinning your ball that has a lot of surfaces, you will have little room on the sides, but you will get away with it.

Now, let’s talk about two-handers. Because you play with both of your hands, you will be able to swing the pattern more and you will see more revs. You will be able to open up the lane and hit the pins right where it’s needed.

Conclusion

Kegel is one of the official lane maintenance companies for the USBC, WTBA, PABCON, ABF, and ETBF. The Kegel oil patterns are loved by bowlers all over the world because of being mid-level, not too easy, not too complicated. Just keep an eye where you’re finding the best friction and reaction and stick to that and you will be good to go. You can always get help from other players or coaches. Once you have the knack for handling the oil pattern, bowling on it will get easier. So, good luck and don’t forget to have fun!

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